[tabbytitle=”Zingtree Classic”]

 

This documentation is for Zingtree Classic. Click the tab above if you are using the New Experience (Beta).

Update Feb. 9, 2021: Added an option to set a variable name.

Some of our customers have asked for a way to display the current time/date/day of the week in a node, set the time zone, and custom format it. There’s a predefined Zingtree Webhook to do just that!

This webhook sets a variable which you can use in any part of your decision tree, format it in a variety of ways, and even perform logic operations on it. Click through below to see our demo of how it all works…

 

Example uses:

  • Display the day of the week.
  • Use a Logic Node to route customers to different nodes for work hours, after hours or weekends.
  • Show the current date and time, display it in a node, and save it as a part of your session.

How to Set Up Timestamps

  1. Edit a node, and click the Apps/Webhooks tab.
  2. Under Call App or Webhook, select Webhook: Zingtree Timestamp.
  3. In the Message Data, you can include an optional return variable name, timezone or date format as parameters to sent to the webhook. (More details below).
    Here’s an example to return a date that looks like 2021-02-11 in the Pacific time zone (Los Angeles), assigning it to a variable named datetime:

  4. Once the node with this webhook has been visited, the timestamp will appear wherever you enter #datetime# in any node.
  5. Click Save Changes when you are done.

See the “Timestamp Webhook Demo” tree from the Zingtree Gallery.

Customizing

In the Message Data area, you can include these parameters:

  • &tz= to set a time zone.
  • &format= to set a custom date format.
  • &return= to set the name of the variable returned. (If you leave it blank, the variable will be called timestamp).

Example message area customizations:

&tz=America/New_York&format=F j,Y h:i:s A
This sets the time zone to Eastern Time (USA), and makes the #timestamp# variable look like ” July 25, 2017, 11:37:27 AM“.

&tz=Australia/Sydney&format=d/m/Y&return=date
This sets the timezone to Sydney, Australia, and makes the #date# variable appear as “25/07/2017”.

&format=l&return=day
This sets a #day# variable to the day of the week.

See the “Timestamp Webhook Demo” Gallery tree for other examples.

Reference

The full list of timezones is here.

The full list of date formatting options is below:

 
format character Description Example returned values
Day
d Day of the month, 2 digits with leading zeros 01 to 31
D A textual representation of a day, three letters Mon through Sun
j Day of the month without leading zeros 1 to 31
l (lowercase ‘L’) A full textual representation of the day of the week Sunday through Saturday
N ISO-8601 numeric representation of the day of the week 1 (for Monday) through 7 (for Sunday)
S English ordinal suffix for the day of the month, 2 characters stndrd or th. Works well with j
w Numeric representation of the day of the week 0 (for Sunday) through 6 (for Saturday)
z The day of the year (starting from 0) 0 through 365
Week
W ISO-8601 week number of year, weeks starting on Monday Example: 42 (the 42nd week in the year)
Month
F A full textual representation of a month, such as January or March January through December
m Numeric representation of a month, with leading zeros 01 through 12
M A short textual representation of a month, three letters Jan through Dec
n Numeric representation of a month, without leading zeros 1 through 12
t Number of days in the given month 28 through 31
Year
L Whether it’s a leap year 1 if it is a leap year, 0 otherwise.
o ISO-8601 week-numbering year. This has the same value as Y, except that if the ISO week number (W) belongs to the previous or next year, that year is used instead. Examples: 1999 or 2003
Y A full numeric representation of a year, 4 digits Examples: 1999 or 2003
y A two digit representation of a year Examples: 99 or 03
Time
a Lowercase Ante meridiem and Post meridiem am or pm
A Uppercase Ante meridiem and Post meridiem AM or PM
B Swatch Internet time 000 through 999
g 12-hour format of an hour without leading zeros 1 through 12
G 24-hour format of an hour without leading zeros 0 through 23
h 12-hour format of an hour with leading zeros 01 through 12
H 24-hour format of an hour with leading zeros 00 through 23
i Minutes with leading zeros 00 to 59
s Seconds with leading zeros 00 through 59
u Microseconds. Note that date() will always generate 000000 since it takes an int parameter, whereas DateTime::format() does support microseconds if DateTime was created with microseconds. Example: 654321
v Milliseconds (added in PHP 7.0.0). Same note applies as for u. Example: 654
Timezone
e Timezone identifier Examples: UTCGMTAtlantic/Azores
I (capital i) Whether or not the date is in daylight saving time 1 if Daylight Saving Time, 0 otherwise.
O Difference to Greenwich time (GMT) without colon between hours and minutes Example: +0200
P Difference to Greenwich time (GMT) with colon between hours and minutes Example: +02:00
p The same as P, but returns Z instead of +00:00 Example: +02:00
T Timezone abbreviation Examples: ESTMDT …
Z Timezone offset in seconds. The offset for timezones west of UTC is always negative, and for those east of UTC is always positive. -43200 through 50400
Full Date/Time
c ISO 8601 date 2004-02-12T15:19:21+00:00
r » RFC 2822 formatted date Example: Thu, 21 Dec 2000 16:01:07 +0200
U Seconds since the Unix Epoch (January 1 1970 00:00:00 GMT)

 

New Experience (Coming Soon)

 

Update Feb. 9, 2021: Added an option to set a variable name.

Some of our customers have asked for a way to display the current time/date/day of the week in a node, set the time zone, and custom format it. There’s a predefined Zingtree Webhook to do just that!

This webhook sets a variable which you can use in any part of your decision tree, format it in a variety of ways, and even perform logic operations on it. Click through below to see our demo of how it all works…

 

Example uses:

  • Display the day of the week.
  • Use a Logic Node to route customers to different nodes for work hours, after hours or weekends.
  • Show the current date and time, display it in a node, and save it as a part of your session.

How to Set Up Timestamps

  1. Edit a node, and click the Apps/Webhooks tab.
  2. Under Call App or Webhook, select Webhook: Zingtree Timestamp.
  3. In the Message Data, you can include an optional return variable name, timezone or date format as parameters to sent to the webhook. (More details below).
    Here’s an example to return a date that looks like 2021-02-11 in the Pacific time zone (Los Angeles), assigning it to a variable named datetime:

  4. Once the node with this webhook has been visited, the timestamp will appear wherever you enter #datetime# in any node.

See the “Timestamp Webhook Demo” tree from the Zingtree Gallery.

Customizing

In the Message Data area, you can include these parameters:

  • &tz= to set a time zone.
  • &format= to set a custom date format.
  • &return= to set the name of the variable returned. (If you leave it blank, the variable will be called timestamp).

Example message area customizations:

&tz=America/New_York&format=F j,Y h:i:s A
This sets the time zone to Eastern Time (USA), and makes the #timestamp# variable look like ” July 25, 2017, 11:37:27 AM“.

&tz=Australia/Sydney&format=d/m/Y&return=date
This sets the timezone to Sydney, Australia, and makes the #date# variable appear as “25/07/2017”.

&format=l&return=day
This sets a #day# variable to the day of the week.

See the “Timestamp Webhook Demo” Gallery tree for other examples.

Reference

The full list of timezones is here.

The full list of date formatting options is below:

 
format character Description Example returned values
Day
d Day of the month, 2 digits with leading zeros 01 to 31
D A textual representation of a day, three letters Mon through Sun
j Day of the month without leading zeros 1 to 31
l (lowercase ‘L’) A full textual representation of the day of the week Sunday through Saturday
N ISO-8601 numeric representation of the day of the week 1 (for Monday) through 7 (for Sunday)
S English ordinal suffix for the day of the month, 2 characters stndrd or th. Works well with j
w Numeric representation of the day of the week 0 (for Sunday) through 6 (for Saturday)
z The day of the year (starting from 0) 0 through 365
Week
W ISO-8601 week number of year, weeks starting on Monday Example: 42 (the 42nd week in the year)
Month
F A full textual representation of a month, such as January or March January through December
m Numeric representation of a month, with leading zeros 01 through 12
M A short textual representation of a month, three letters Jan through Dec
n Numeric representation of a month, without leading zeros 1 through 12
t Number of days in the given month 28 through 31
Year
L Whether it’s a leap year 1 if it is a leap year, 0 otherwise.
o ISO-8601 week-numbering year. This has the same value as Y, except that if the ISO week number (W) belongs to the previous or next year, that year is used instead. Examples: 1999 or 2003
Y A full numeric representation of a year, 4 digits Examples: 1999 or 2003
y A two digit representation of a year Examples: 99 or 03
Time
a Lowercase Ante meridiem and Post meridiem am or pm
A Uppercase Ante meridiem and Post meridiem AM or PM
B Swatch Internet time 000 through 999
g 12-hour format of an hour without leading zeros 1 through 12
G 24-hour format of an hour without leading zeros 0 through 23
h 12-hour format of an hour with leading zeros 01 through 12
H 24-hour format of an hour with leading zeros 00 through 23
i Minutes with leading zeros 00 to 59
s Seconds with leading zeros 00 through 59
u Microseconds. Note that date() will always generate 000000 since it takes an int parameter, whereas DateTime::format() does support microseconds if DateTime was created with microseconds. Example: 654321
v Milliseconds (added in PHP 7.0.0). Same note applies as for u. Example: 654
Timezone
e Timezone identifier Examples: UTCGMTAtlantic/Azores
I (capital i) Whether or not the date is in daylight saving time 1 if Daylight Saving Time, 0 otherwise.
O Difference to Greenwich time (GMT) without colon between hours and minutes Example: +0200
P Difference to Greenwich time (GMT) with colon between hours and minutes Example: +02:00
p The same as P, but returns Z instead of +00:00 Example: +02:00
T Timezone abbreviation Examples: ESTMDT …
Z Timezone offset in seconds. The offset for timezones west of UTC is always negative, and for those east of UTC is always positive. -43200 through 50400
Full Date/Time
c ISO 8601 date 2004-02-12T15:19:21+00:00
r » RFC 2822 formatted date Example: Thu, 21 Dec 2000 16:01:07 +0200
U Seconds since the Unix Epoch (January 1 1970 00:00:00 GMT)